A Bruce Effect in Wild Geladas

@article{Roberts2012ABE,
  title={A Bruce Effect in Wild Geladas},
  author={Eila K. Roberts and Amy Lu and Thore J. Bergman and Jacinta C. Beehner},
  journal={Science},
  year={2012},
  volume={335},
  pages={1222 - 1225}
}
Avoiding Infanticide In male dominated hierarchies, newly dominant males will sometimes kill resident infants. In lab studies in mice conducted in the 1950s, Hilda Bruce showed that females introduced to an unfamiliar male will terminate their pregnancies, a process subsequently referred to as a Bruce Effect. Roberts et al. (p. 1222, published online 23 February) followed multiple dominance transitions within wild gelada baboons and showed that live birthrate among females previously identified… 
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This work compiled data on the Bruce effect, infanticide, and paternal care from one particularly rich source of information, rodents, but found the data set to be less rich than expected and found no clear relationship among the traits.
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TLDR
Results suggest that sexually selected infanticide in geladas may, indeed, be a threat to females with dependent infants and raise the possibility that anecdotal reports of pregnancy termination, accelerated weaning, and deceptive sexual swellings may represent female counterstrategies to male infanticides in gelada.
Exposure to strange adults does not cause pregnancy disruption or infanticide in the gray-tailed vole
TLDR
It is concluded that neither the Bruce effect nor infanticide occurred differentially as a consequence of the treatments in gray-tailed voles, and field verification is recommended for other species of murid rodents that exhibit theBruce effect before the results are applied to evolutionary theory.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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