Corpus ID: 55398608

A Bionomic Sketch of the Giant Hornet, Vespa mandarinia, a Serious Pest for Japanese Apiculture

@inproceedings{Matsuura1973ABS,
  title={A Bionomic Sketch of the Giant Hornet, Vespa mandarinia, a Serious Pest for Japanese Apiculture},
  author={M. Matsuura and S. Sakagami},
  year={1973}
}
Many Japanese beekeepers who consult standard books on apiculture publish­ ed in Europe or North America must feel a strong discontent after reading through the chapter dealing with bee enemies. They may find there little or no information on the hornets or the genus Vespa, which have extirpated annually thousands of bee hives in Japan. The poor information depends on the uneven northward expansion of this predominantly subtropical genus. Most parts of Central and North Europe are inhabited by… Expand
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