• Corpus ID: 146236431

A BIOMECHANICAL COMPARISON OF THE FRONT AND REAR LAT PULL- DOWN EXERCISE

@inproceedings{Michael2003ABC,
  title={A BIOMECHANICAL COMPARISON OF THE FRONT AND REAR LAT PULL- DOWN EXERCISE},
  author={Gary Michael},
  year={2003}
}
of Thesis Presented to the Graduate School of the University of Florida in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Science in Exercise and Sport Sciences A BIOMECHANICAL COMPARISON OF THE FRONT AND REAR LAT PULLDOWN EXERCISE By Gary Michael (GM) Pugh May, 2003 Chairperson: Michael E. Powers Major Department: Exercise and Sport Sciences The purpose of this study was to compare upper latissimus dorsi, lower latissimus dorsi, lower trapezius, anterior deltoid, posterior… 
1 Citations

Grip Width and Forearm Orientation Effects on Muscle Activity During the Lat Pull-Down

Compared-measures analysis of variance for each muscle revealed that a pronated grip elicited greater LD activity than a supinated grip, but had no influence of grip type on the MT and BB muscles.

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