• Corpus ID: 51847381

A BIOMECHANICAL ANALYSIS OF FRONT VERSUS BACK SQUAT: INJURY IMPLICATIONS

@inproceedings{Diggin2011ABA,
  title={A BIOMECHANICAL ANALYSIS OF FRONT VERSUS BACK SQUAT: INJURY IMPLICATIONS},
  author={David Diggin and Ciaran O’Regan and Niamh Whelan and Sean Daly and V. McLoughlin and Linda McNamara and Autumn Reilly},
  year={2011}
}
The aim of this study was to examine the differences in trunk and lower limb kinematics between the front and back squat. 2D kinematic data was collected as participants (n = 12) completed three repetitions of both front and back squat exercises at 50 % of their back squat one repetition maximum. Stance width was standardised at 107(±10) % of biacromial breadth. The Wilcoxon signed ranks test was used to examine significant differences in dependent variables between both techniques. Results… 

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