A BIOLOGICAL MARKET ANALYSIS OF THE PLANT‐MYCORRHIZAL SYMBIOSIS

@article{Wyatt2014ABM,
  title={A BIOLOGICAL MARKET ANALYSIS OF THE PLANT‐MYCORRHIZAL SYMBIOSIS},
  author={Gregory A. K. Wyatt and E. Toby Kiers and Andy Gardner and Stuart Andrew West},
  journal={Evolution},
  year={2014},
  volume={68}
}
It has been argued that cooperative behavior in the plant-mycorrhizal mutualism resembles trade in a market economy and can be understood using economic tools. [...] Key Result We find that: (i) as in a market, individuals are favored to divide resources among trading partners in direct relation to the relative amount of resources received, termed linear proportional discrimination; (ii) mutualistic trade is more likely to be favored when individuals are able to interact with more partners of both species, and…Expand
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