A 9000-year fire history from the Oregon Coast Range, based on a high-resolution charcoal study

@article{Long1998A9F,
  title={A 9000-year fire history from the Oregon Coast Range, based on a high-resolution charcoal study},
  author={Colin J. Long and Cathy Whitlock and Patrick J. Bartlein and Sarah H. Millspaugh},
  journal={Canadian Journal of Forest Research},
  year={1998},
  volume={28},
  pages={774-787}
}
High-resolution analysis of macroscopic charcoal in sediment cores from Little Lake was used to reconstruct the fire history of the last 9000 years. Variations in sediment magnetism were examined to detect changes in allochthonous sedimentation associated with past fire occurrence. Fire intervals from ca. 9000 to 6850 calendar years BP averaged 110 ± 20 years, when the climate was warmer and drier than today and xerophytic vegetation dominated. From ca. 6850 to 2750 calendar years BP the mean… 

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