A 3.8-million-year-old hominin cranium from Woranso-Mille, Ethiopia

@article{HaileSelassie2019A3H,
  title={A 3.8-million-year-old hominin cranium from Woranso-Mille, Ethiopia},
  author={Yohannes Haile-Selassie and Stephanie M Melillo and Antonino Vazzana and Stefano Benazzi and Timothy M Ryan},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2019},
  pages={1-6}
}
The cranial morphology of the earliest known hominins in the genus Australopithecus remains unclear. The oldest species in this genus (Australopithecus anamensis, specimens of which have been dated to 4.2–3.9 million years ago) is known primarily from jaws and teeth, whereas younger species (dated to 3.5–2.0 million years ago) are typically represented by multiple skulls. Here we describe a nearly complete hominin cranium from Woranso-Mille (Ethiopia) that we date to 3.8 million years ago. We… Expand
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