A 28,000 Years Old Cro-Magnon mtDNA Sequence Differs from All Potentially Contaminating Modern Sequences

@article{Caramelli2008A2Y,
  title={A 28,000 Years Old Cro-Magnon mtDNA Sequence Differs from All Potentially Contaminating Modern Sequences},
  author={David Caramelli and Lucio Milani and Stefania Vai and Alessandra Modi and Elena Pecchioli and Matteo Girardi and Elena Pilli and Martina Lari and Barbara Lippi and Annamaria Ronchitelli and Francesco Mallegni and Antonella Casoli and Giorgio Bertorelle and Guido Barbujani},
  journal={PLoS ONE},
  year={2008},
  volume={3}
}
Background DNA sequences from ancient speciments may in fact result from undetected contamination of the ancient specimens by modern DNA, and the problem is particularly challenging in studies of human fossils. Doubts on the authenticity of the available sequences have so far hampered genetic comparisons between anatomically archaic (Neandertal) and early modern (Cro-Magnoid) Europeans. Methodology/Principal Findings We typed the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) hypervariable region I in a 28,000… 

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