• Corpus ID: 23672748

A . 8 MINOR TRANQUILIZERS AND NON-BARBITURATE SEDATIVE-HYPNOTICS

@inproceedings{2017A8,
  title={A . 8 MINOR TRANQUILIZERS AND NON-BARBITURATE SEDATIVE-HYPNOTICS},
  author={},
  year={2017}
}
  • Published 2017
  • Psychology
INTRODUCTION There are many common drugs which have significant sedative-hypnotic properties. Alcohol and barbiturates have been discussed separately in this appendix, and their many pharmacological similarities were indicated. Barbiturates are often considered the prototype of sedative-hypnotic drugs; pharmacologically related compounds are frequently identified or discussed in terms of their similarities to and differences from them. We shall consider a rather heterogeneous aggregate of… 

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