A "Good-Sperm" Model Can Explain the Evolution of Costly Multiple Mating by Females

@article{Yasui1997AM,
  title={A "Good-Sperm" Model Can Explain the Evolution of Costly Multiple Mating by Females},
  author={Yukio Yasui},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={1997},
  volume={149},
  pages={573 - 584}
}
  • Y. Yasui
  • Published 1 March 1997
  • Biology
  • The American Naturalist
Multiple mating by females (or polyandry) is one of the most controversial subjects in sexual selection and mating systems theory (Smith 1984; Halliday and Arnold 1987; Birkhead and Moller 1992). In many animals, mass production of sperm is generally far cheaper than production of ova (but see Dewsbury 1982). Thus, multiple mating is clearly adaptive for males because the more females with which males mate, the more offspring they can sire (Trivers 1972). However, females can produce no more… 
Superior sperm competitors sire higher–quality young
TLDR
In a laboratory experiment with yellow dung flies, it was found that males that were more successful in sperm competition also had offspring that developed faster, providing some support for polyandry evolving as a means of producing higher–quality offspring via sperm competition.
Polyandrous females benefit by producing sons that achieve high reproductive success in a competitive environment
  • R. C. Firman
  • Biology
    Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
  • 2011
TLDR
It is shown that female house mice benefit from polyandry by producing sons that achieve increased fitness in a semi-natural environment.
Fitness consequences of female multiple mating: A direct test of indirect benefits
TLDR
The study provides strong evidence that multiple mating is advantageous to females, even when males contribute only sperm, through an increase in fecundity in the first generation, rather than through other fitness correlates such as size at birth, growth rate, time to sexual maturation and survival.
Male house mice evolving with post-copulatory sexual selection sire embryos with increased viability.
TLDR
It is found that males from lineages evolving with post-copulatory sexual selection sire offspring with increased viability, suggesting that polyandry results in the production of higher quality offspring and thus provides long-term fitness benefits to females.
Female fitness, sperm traits and patterns of paternity in an Australian polyandrous mouse
TLDR
It is shown that the reproductive output of female sandy inland mice did not differ between females mated monandrously (single male) or polyandrousally (two males) and that mating position is a critical determinant of male fitness in mammalian sperm competition.
Polyandry produces sexy sons at the cost of daughters in red flour beetles
  • A. Pai, G. Yan
  • Biology
    Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
  • 2002
TLDR
A fitness trade–off between male and female offspring from polyandrous mothers in a competitive environment is demonstrated and the mechanisms and biological significance of this unique phenomenon are discussed.
Multiple benefits of multiple mating in guppies.
  • J. Evans, A. Magurran
  • Biology
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • 2000
TLDR
The results indicate that multiply mated females secure substantive advantages: They have shorter gestation times and larger broods, and they produce offspring with better developed schooling abilities and escape responses than their singly mated counterparts.
Genetic quality and sexual selection: an integrated framework for good genes and compatible genes
TLDR
This paper presents a verbal model of the effect of good genes sexual selection and compatible genesSexual selection on population genetic variation in fitness, and discusses the potential trade‐offs that might exist betweenmate choice for good genes and mate choice for compatible genes.
Last male sperm precedence in a polygamous squid
TLDR
If widespread in cephalopods, last male sperm precedence could help to explain the evolution of mate guarding (or long copulation duration) and sperm removal behaviour in this group.
Female Mate Choice in Rodents
TLDR
The t-complex in mice, the major histocompatibility complex including the difficulty of linking its diversity to mate choice, the oxytocin locus and its impact, both the olfactory system and the accessory olfatory system, and recent discoveries such as the ESP-1 locus are covered.
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 45 REFERENCES
Sperm Competition and the Evolution of Multiple Mating
TLDR
A deterministic genetical model of the sexy-sperm process is described here: under the assumptions of this model, sperm competition plays no special role in the evolution of female mating frequency and linkage disequilibrium is the driving force.
Sperm Utilization Strategies in Nonsocial Insects
TLDR
It is suggested that females often largely determine the optimal male strategy which provides the optimal sperm displacement pattern for the females, and that selection on males independent of selection pressures on females is postulated to exert a major influence on the sperm precedence pattern of a population.
Why do Females Make it so Difficult for Males to Fertilize their Eggs
TLDR
If females have evolved more and more effective barriers to sperm in their reproductive tract as means of mate choice, coevolution between female anti-sperm responses and male abilities to overcome these will result in increasingly elaborate forms of female hostility towards sperm.
Why do female adders copulate so frequently?
TLDR
These field studies on Swedish adders provide the first empirical evidence that multiple copulations, with different partners each time, increase offspring viability.
Ejaculate Cost and Male Choice
TLDR
The problems of limited ejaculatory capacity and male choice merit greater attention in both theory and in empirical research.
THE EVOLUTION OF MATE PREFERENCES FOR MULTIPLE SEXUAL ORNAMENTS
TLDR
Sexual preferences for multiple Fisher traits are likely to evolve alongside preference for a single handicap trait that indicates male quality, showing a general difference in the evolutionary outcome of these two causes of sexual selection.
Sperm competition games: raffles and roles
  • G. Parker
  • Biology
    Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
  • 1990
TLDR
Evolutionary games in which two males mate with the same female are examined by using an evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS) approach, which depends critically on the information available to the two competitors, and whether they occupy roles (of first or second to mate) randomly or non-randomly.
MATING OF EBONY VESTIGIAL AND WILD TYPE DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER IN LIGHT AND DARK
TLDR
The result of matings using males from ebony, vestigial and wild type stocks under different illuminations shows that the mating behavior of homozygous males depends on whether matings are carried out in the light or the dark, and that this affects th-eir fitness.
...
...