987 THE ART OF ALLEVIATING PAIN IN GREEK MYTHOLOGY

@article{Tre2005987TA,
  title={987 THE ART OF ALLEVIATING PAIN IN GREEK MYTHOLOGY},
  author={Hatice Sabiha T{\"u}re and Uğur T{\"u}re and Fevzi Yılmaz G{\"o}ğ{\"u}ş and Anton Valavanis and Mahmut Gazi Yașargil},
  journal={European Journal of Pain},
  year={2005},
  volume={10}
}

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