60Fe anomaly in a deep-sea manganese crust and implications for a nearby supernova source.

@article{Knie200460FeAI,
  title={60Fe anomaly in a deep-sea manganese crust and implications for a nearby supernova source.},
  author={Klaus Knie and Gunther Korschinek and Th. Faestermann and Ernst A. Dorfi and G. Rugel and A. Wallner},
  journal={Physical review letters},
  year={2004},
  volume={93 17},
  pages={
          171103
        }
}
A nearby supernova (SN) explosion in the past can be confirmed by the detection of radioisotopes on Earth that were produced and ejected by the SN. We have now measured a well resolved time profile of the 60Fe concentration in a deep-sea ferromanganese crust and found a highly significant increase 2.8 Myr ago. The amount of 60Fe is compatible with the deposition of ejecta from a SN at a distance of a few 10 pc. The well defined time of the SN explosion makes it possible to search for plausible… Expand
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