5HTTLPR Polymorphism and Enlargement of the Pulvinar: Unlocking the Backdoor to the Limbic System

@article{Young20075HTTLPRPA,
  title={5HTTLPR Polymorphism and Enlargement of the Pulvinar: Unlocking the Backdoor to the Limbic System},
  author={K. Young and L. Holcomb and W. Bonkale and P. Hicks and D. German},
  journal={Biological Psychiatry},
  year={2007},
  volume={61},
  pages={813-818}
}
  • K. Young, L. Holcomb, +2 authors D. German
  • Published 2007
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • BACKGROUND The 5HTTLPR genetic variant of the serotonin transporter (SERT), which consists of a long (SERT-l) and short (SERT-s) allele, has emerged as a major factor influencing emotional behavior and brain anatomy. The pulvinar nucleus of the thalamus projects to important limbic nuclei including the amygdala and cingulate cortex, is involved in the processing of stimuli with emotional content, and contains an abundance of SERT. METHODS Stereological methods were used to measure pulvinar… CONTINUE READING
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