2007 National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing: Methods and Key Findings

@article{Slade20092007NS,
  title={2007 National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing: Methods and Key Findings},
  author={Tim Slade and Amy K Johnston and Mark A. Oakley Browne and Gavin Andrews and Harvey A. Whiteford},
  journal={Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry},
  year={2009},
  volume={43},
  pages={594 - 605}
}
Objective: To provide a description of the methods and key findings of the 2007 Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing. [...] Key Method Method: A national face-to-face household survey of 8841 (60% response rate) community residents aged between 16 and 85 years was carried out using the World Mental Health Survey Initiative version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Diagnoses were made according to ICD-10.Expand
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