2000 Years of Parallel Societies in Stone Age Central Europe

@article{Bollongino20132000YO,
  title={2000 Years of Parallel Societies in Stone Age Central Europe},
  author={R. Bollongino and Olaf Nehlich and M. Richards and J. Orschiedt and Mark George Thomas and Christian Sell and Zuzana Fajko{\vs}ov{\'a} and Adam Powell and J. Burger},
  journal={Science},
  year={2013},
  volume={342},
  pages={479 - 481}
}
Farming or Fishing Evidence has been mounting that most modern European populations originated from the immigration of farmers who displaced the hunter-gatherers of the Mesolithic. Bollongino et al. (p. 479, published online 10 October) present analyses of palaeogenetic and isotopic data from Neolithic human skeletons from the Blätterhöhle burial site in Germany. The analyses identify a Neolithic freshwater fish–eating hunter-gatherer group, living contemporaneously and in close proximity to a… Expand

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