2 Language Development in Children with Unilateral Brain Injury

@inproceedings{Bates20002LD,
  title={2 Language Development in Children with Unilateral Brain Injury},
  author={Elizabeth Bates and Katherine L Roe},
  year={2000}
}
Aphasia (defined as the loss or impairment of language abilities following acquired brain injury) is strongly associated with damage to the left hemisphere in adults. This well-known finding has led to the hypothesis that the left hemisphere is innately specialized for language, and may be the site of a specific "language organ". However, for over a century we have known that young children with left-hemisphere damage (LHD) do not suffer from aphasia, and in most studies do not differ… CONTINUE READING
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