2 . Wildlife population structure and parasite transmission : implications for disease management

@inproceedings{Cross20082W,
  title={2 . Wildlife population structure and parasite transmission : implications for disease management},
  author={Paul C. Cross and Julian A Drewe and Victoria Patrek and Gareth P. Pearce and Michael D Samuel and Richard John Delahay},
  year={2008}
}
The beginning stages of research often involve describing patterns (e.g. males tend to more heavily parasitized than females for a given subset of species). From those initial patterns, researchers then test hypothesised mechanisms that may create those patterns. As an emerging discipline, much of wildlife disease management is about detecting trends and associations, and currently there are few guiding principles that both explain the trends and are applicable across a broad range hosts and… CONTINUE READING

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