1agricultural Productivity and Rural Incomes in England and the Yangtze Delta, C.1620–C.1820

@article{Allen20091agriculturalPA,
  title={1agricultural Productivity and Rural Incomes in England and the Yangtze Delta, C.1620–C.1820},
  author={Robert C. Allen},
  journal={Wiley-Blackwell: Economic History Review},
  year={2009}
}
  • R. Allen
  • Published 9 July 2009
  • Economics, History
  • Wiley-Blackwell: Economic History Review
The productivity of agriculture in England and the Yangtze Delta are compared c.1620 and c.1820 in order to gauge the performance of the most advanced part of China vis-a-vis its counterpart in Europe. The value of real output is compared using purchasing power parity exchange rates. Output per hectare was nine times greater in the Yangtze Delta than in England. More surprisingly, output per day worked was about 90 per cent of the English performance. This put Yangtze farmers slightly behind… 

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