11 January 1887, the Day Medicine Changed: Joseph Grancher's Defense of Pasteur's Treatment for Rabies

@article{Gelfand200211J1,
  title={11 January 1887, the Day Medicine Changed: Joseph Grancher's Defense of Pasteur's Treatment for Rabies},
  author={Toby Gelfand},
  journal={Bulletin of the History of Medicine},
  year={2002},
  volume={76},
  pages={698 - 718}
}
  • T. Gelfand
  • Published 21 November 2002
  • Medicine
  • Bulletin of the History of Medicine
The Pasteur treatment for rabies is generally seen in terms of a triumphant penetration of laboratory science into clinical medicine. Similarly, the debates challenging the Pastorians have been interpreted as retrograde and inevitably vain efforts by a few disgruntled clinicians to resist scientific progress. This article revises the standard account by showing that the defenders of Pasteur perceived a serious threat to their enterprise and acted expeditiously to counter a potential crisis by… 
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