1 Final Report on the Safety Assessment of Sodium Laureth Sulfate and Ammonium Laureth Sulfate

@article{19831FR,
  title={1 Final Report on the Safety Assessment of Sodium Laureth Sulfate and Ammonium Laureth Sulfate},
  author={},
  journal={International Journal of Toxicology},
  year={1983},
  volume={2},
  pages={1 - 34}
}
  • Published 1 September 1983
  • Chemistry
  • International Journal of Toxicology
Sodium Laureth Sulfate and Ammonium Laureth Sulfate are used in cosmetic products as cleansing agents, emulsifiers, stabilizers, and solubilizers. The ingredients have been shown to produce eye and/or skin irritation in experimental animals and in some human test subjects; irritation may occur in some users of cosmetic formulations containing the ingredients under consideration, The irritant effects are similar to those produced by other detergents, and the severity of the irritation appears to… 

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