'The fact that possesses my imagination': Rachel Carson, Science and Writing

@article{Montefiore2001TheFT,
  title={'The fact that possesses my imagination': Rachel Carson, Science and Writing},
  author={Janet E. Montefiore},
  journal={Women: A Cultural Review},
  year={2001},
  volume={12},
  pages={44 - 56}
}
Rachel Carson is a famous but unknown writer. She is remembered as a pioneering heroine of the ecological movement, but even her Silent Spring is hardly read and the great books about the sea that made her name are unknown to the public. Recent biographical accounts have focused on the problems Carson faced as a woman entering the male-dominated scientific community, and the sexist reception of her books. But her real life was plainly in her writing. Although the accounts of geology in The Sea… Expand
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