''So cool, right?'': Canadian English Entering the 21st Century

@article{Tagliamonte2006SoCR,
  title={''So cool, right?'': Canadian English Entering the 21st Century},
  author={Sali A. Tagliamonte},
  journal={The Canadian Journal of Linguistics / La revue canadienne de linguistique},
  year={2006},
  volume={51},
  pages={309 - 331}
}
  • Sali A. Tagliamonte
  • Published 1 November 2006
  • Linguistics
  • The Canadian Journal of Linguistics / La revue canadienne de linguistique
A socially stratified sample—the Toronto English Corpus—together with the construct of apparent time (with speakers aged 10–90 years) reveal that certain features are declining, including future will, deontic have got to, possessive have got, intensifier very, and the sentence tag you know. On the other hand, some features are on the rise, including future going to, deontic have to, possessive have, intensifiers really and so, and sentences tags such as whatever, so, and stuff like that. The… 
A Two-Tiered Change in Canadian English: The Emergence of a Streamlined Evidential System
Among the complementizers that can link seem, appear, look, sound, and feel to finite subordinate clauses – as if, as though, like, that, and a null form – there is a lexical replacement nearing
Comparative Complementizers in Canadian English: Insights from Early Fiction
There are five verbs in present-day English that indicate the apparentness of a subsequent finite subordinate clause: seem, appear, look, sound, and feel. These verbs can be linked to the lower
THE SOCIAL MEANING OF EH IN CANADIAN ENGLISH ∗
The recent surge in sociolinguistic investigation of pragmatic markers such as general extenders (and stuff, and things like that), discourse and quotative like, and utterance final tags (right, you
The Stuff of Change: General Extenders in Toronto, Canada
This article examines general extenders (GEs) in the English spoken in Toronto, Canada, using a 1.2-million-word corpus stratified by age, sex, and education. Employing quantitative techniques, the
A Cool Comparison: Adjectives of Positive Evaluation in Toronto, Canada and York, England
This paper examines variation and change in the adjectives used to express “highly positive evaluation” in the varieties of English spoken in Toronto, Canada, and York, England. Building on earlier
The changing future: competition, specialization and reorganization in the contemporary English future temporal reference system
The English future temporal reference system has long been recognized as a variable system undergoing change. The main variants in contemporary English (will and be going to) have both been argued to
The Development of And Stuff in Canadian English: A Longitudinal Study of Apparent Grammaticalization
This paper examines the development of and stuff, a general extender (GE), in Canadian English in longitudinal perspective. Previous research (Cheshire 2007; Tagliamonte & Denis 2010; Pichler & Levey
Studying real-time change in the adverbial subjunctive: The value of theBank of Canadian English
The dearth of real-time studies of the histories of transatlantic English varieties can be attributed to the lack of readily accessible, electronic corpora. However, for Canadian English (CanE) we
Transatlantic variation in English adverb placement
Abstract This study examines the placement of an adverb with respect to a modal or perfect auxiliary in English (e.g., It might potentially escape / It potentially might escape). The data are drawn
Transatlantic variation in English adverb placement
This study examines the placement of an adverb with respect to a modal or perfect auxiliary in English (e.g., It might potentially escape / It potentially might escape). The data are drawn from two
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 76 REFERENCES
Well weird, right dodgy, very strange, really cool: Layering and recycling in English intensifiers
This article examines variable usage of intensifiers in a corpus from a socially and generationally stratified community. Using multivariate analyses, the authors assess the direction of effect,
An English ''like no other''?: Language Contact and Change in Quebec
Although the received wisdom is that English in Quebec, as a minority language, has undergone contact-induced language change, little scientific evidence has been brought to bear on this claim. We
He’s like, she’s like: The quotative system in Canadian youth
Due to the recent and rapid newcomer, be like, the English quotative system is a good place to catch language change in action. However, since most previous analyses target people in their early
The grammaticization of going to in (African American) English
Focusing on the process of grammaticization, whereby items with lexical meaning evolve into grammatical markers, this article examines the future temporal reference sectors of three diaspora
Lawless and vulgar innovations: Victorian views of Canadian English
Visitors to Upper Canada from Britain were surprised by the differences they discovered between the English language spoken here and in the mother country, and they were inclined to judge the
So eh? is Canadian, eh?
  • W. S. Avis
  • Linguistics
    Canadian Journal of Linguistics/Revue canadienne de linguistique
  • 1972
In a somewhat condescending review of A Dictionary of Canadianisms on Historical Principles some years ago, Mavor Moore complained about “a slighting of spoken practice and of distinctive Canadian
Frequency and variation in the community grammar: Tracking a new change through the generations
In this article we perform a quantitative analysis of verbs of quotation in a cohesive speech community. The incoming form be like overshadows all other quotative verbs among speakers under 30. This
The Canada-US Border as a Vanishing Isogloss: The Evidence of Chesterfield
76_ 1n Harold B. Allen's Linguistic Atlas of the Upper Midwest (LAUM; 1973St ·1.163-66), the lexical responses for 'the long piece of furniture to sit or c retch out on' show davenport as the most
Be like et al. beyond America: The quotative system in British and Canadian youth
In this paper we study the quotative system of contemporary British and Canadian youth. Multivariate analysis of nearly 1300 quotative verbs demonstrates that the innovative form belike is productive
Focus on Canada
1. Introduction (by Clarke, Sandra) 2. "Lawless and vulgar innovations": Victorian views of Canadian English (by Chambers, J.K.) 3. Canadian English lexicography (by Gregg, Robert J.) 4. The
...
...