prediction of wound healing outcome using skin perfusion pressure and transcutaneous oximetry: a single-center experience in 100 patients.

@article{Lo2009,
  title={ prediction of wound healing outcome using skin perfusion pressure and transcutaneous oximetry: a single-center experience in 100 patients.},
  author={Takkin Lo and Richard Sample and Patrick M Moore and Philip Gold},
  journal={Wounds : a compendium of clinical research and practice},
  year={2009},
  volume={21 11},
  pages={310-6}
}
Chronic lower extremity wounds are challenging and typically occur in patients with complicating conditions such as diabetes and peripheral vascular disease. Noninvasive modalities developed to assess wound healing potential, such as transcutaneous oximetry (TcPO2), present problems including lengthy test time, variable results, and anatomical limitations. Skin perfusion pressure (SPP) testing appears to be a timely, objective, and reliable alternative. This prospective, single center… CONTINUE READING

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