“You are one of us”: Communities of Marginality, Vulnerability, and Secrecy in Margaret Atwood’s Alias Grace

@article{Lpez2012YouAO,
  title={“You are one of us”: Communities of Marginality, Vulnerability, and Secrecy in Margaret Atwood’s Alias Grace},
  author={Mar{\'i}a J. L{\'o}pez},
  journal={ESC: English Studies in Canada},
  year={2012},
  volume={38},
  pages={157 - 177}
}
It is revealing that Margaret Atwood should have chosen for her 1996 novel the title of Alias Grace, which points to two central and interrelated aspects of this literary work. On the one hand, it indicates that the fictional world it denotes revolves around one individual, namely, the historical figure of Grace Marks, an Irish immigrant in Canada sentenced to life imprisonment after being convicted in 1843 for her involvement in the murder of her household employer, Thomas Kinnear, and of his… 
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