“Yiddish Literature for the Masses”?; A Reconsideration of Who Read What in Jewish Eastern Europe

@article{Quint2005YiddishLF,
  title={“Yiddish Literature for the Masses”?; A Reconsideration of Who Read What in Jewish Eastern Europe},
  author={A. Quint},
  journal={AJS Review},
  year={2005},
  volume={29},
  pages={61 - 89}
}
In the early 1880s, the staunch Hebraist and bibliophile Ephraim Deinard (1846–1930) became a reluctant witness to the fast-paced growth of modern Yiddish culture that began in his hometown of Odessa. At the time, Deinard owned a Hebrew bookshop that had been sliding toward bankruptcy until he grudgingly adapted his wares to better reflect the market forces of the Jewish reading culture. In Memories of My People (Zikhronot bat עami), he briefly accounts for (in his view) the ill fortune of… Expand
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