“Who Owns the Money?” Currency, Property, and Popular Sovereignty in Nicole Oresme’s De moneta

@article{Woodhouse2017WhoOT,
  title={“Who Owns the Money?” Currency, Property, and Popular Sovereignty in Nicole Oresme’s De moneta},
  author={A. Woodhouse},
  journal={Speculum},
  year={2017},
  volume={92},
  pages={85 - 116}
}
  • A. Woodhouse
  • Published 2017
  • History
  • Speculum
  • As for the right of coining money, it is of the same nature as law, and only he who has the power to make law can regulate the coinage. . . . Indeed, after law itself, there is nothing of greater consequence than the title, value, and measure of coins, as we have shown in a separate treatise, and in every wellordered state, it is the sovereign prince alone who has this power. Jean Bodin, On Sovereignty1 
    1 Citations

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