“They want to know where they came from”: population genetics, identity, and family genealogy

@article{Tutton2004TheyWT,
  title={“They want to know where they came from”: population genetics, identity, and family genealogy},
  author={Richard Tutton},
  journal={New Genetics and Society},
  year={2004},
  volume={23},
  pages={105 - 120}
}
  • R. Tutton
  • Published 1 April 2004
  • Biology, Medicine
  • New Genetics and Society
This paper discusses the changing relationship between population genetics, family genealogy and identity. It reports on empirical research with participants in a genetic study who anticipated that personal feedback on the analysis of their donated samples would elucidate aspects of their own family genealogies. The paper also documents how geneticists, building on the practices of offering personal feedback to research participants, have developed genetic tests marketed directly to people… Expand
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