“The seven sins” of the Hebbian synapse: Can the hypothesis of synaptic plasticity explain long-term memory consolidation?

@article{Arshavsky2006TheSS,
  title={“The seven sins” of the Hebbian synapse: Can the hypothesis of synaptic plasticity explain long-term memory consolidation?},
  author={Yuri I. Arshavsky},
  journal={Progress in Neurobiology},
  year={2006},
  volume={80},
  pages={99-113}
}
Memorizing new facts and events means that entering information produces specific physical changes within the brain. According to the commonly accepted view, traces of memory are stored through the structural modifications of synaptic connections, which result in changes of synaptic efficiency and, therefore, in formations of new patterns of neural activity (the hypothesis of synaptic plasticity). Most of the current knowledge on learning and initial stages of memory consolidation ("synaptic… CONTINUE READING
Related Discussions
This paper has been referenced on Twitter 1 time. VIEW TWEETS

From This Paper

Topics from this paper.

Citations

Publications citing this paper.
Showing 1-10 of 24 extracted citations

Alzheimer disease and cellular mechanisms of memory storage.

Journal of neuropathology and experimental neurology • 2014
View 1 Excerpt

References

Publications referenced by this paper.
Showing 1-10 of 169 references

The neurobiology of consolidations, or, how stable is the engram?

Annual review of psychology • 2004
View 10 Excerpts
Highly Influenced

Protein synthesis and memory: a review.

Psychological bulletin • 1984
View 6 Excerpts
Highly Influenced

Genomic theory

S. Peña de Ortiz, M. Colón, Y. I. Arshavsky
2004
View 9 Excerpts
Highly Influenced

Experience-dependent expression of the gene

Y. I. Arshavsky
2003
View 16 Excerpts
Highly Influenced

Mechanisms of Memory

J. D. Sweatt
2003
View 8 Excerpts
Highly Influenced

Why are some neurons replaced in adult brain?

The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience • 2002
View 4 Excerpts
Highly Influenced

Adult neurogenesis produces a large pool of new granule cells in the dentate gyrus.

The Journal of comparative neurology • 2001
View 3 Excerpts
Highly Influenced

Memory and DNA.

Journal of theoretical biology • 2001
View 4 Excerpts
Highly Influenced

Cellular mechanisms of learning and the biological basis of individuality

E. R. Kandel
Principles of Neural Science • 2000
View 8 Excerpts
Highly Influenced

Similar Papers

Loading similar papers…