“THE NEWEST RELIGIOUS SECT HAS STARTED IN LOS ANGELES”: RACE, CLASS, ETHNICITY, AND THE ORIGINS OF THE PENTECOSTAL MOVEMENT, 1906-1913

@article{Campbell2010THENR,
  title={“THE NEWEST RELIGIOUS SECT HAS STARTED IN LOS ANGELES”: RACE, CLASS, ETHNICITY, AND THE ORIGINS OF THE PENTECOSTAL MOVEMENT, 1906-1913},
  author={M L H Campbell},
  journal={The Journal of African American History},
  year={2010},
  volume={95},
  pages={1 - 25}
}
  • M. L. Campbell
  • Published 1 January 2010
  • History
  • The Journal of African American History
When the well-respected scholar and editor W. E. B. Du Bois arrived in Los Angeles, California, in May 1913 as the guest of African Wesley Chapel, one of the elite African American churches in the city, it was estimated that more than two thousand people--African Americans, other people of color, and even some whites--were there to greet him; and over the next week they showed him westerners' grand hospitality. Subsequently, he published in The Crisis magazine a detailed account of his visit to… 
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