“Small Size” in the Philippine Human Fossil Record: Is it Meaningful for a Better Understanding of the Evolutionary History of the Negritos?

@inproceedings{Dtroit2013SmallSI,
  title={“Small Size” in the Philippine Human Fossil Record: Is it Meaningful for a Better Understanding of the Evolutionary History of the Negritos?},
  author={Florent D{\'e}troit and Julien Corny and Eusebio Dizon and Armand Mijares},
  booktitle={Human Biology: The Official Publication of the American Association of Anthropological Genetics},
  year={2013}
}
Abstract “Pygmy populations” are recognized in several places over the world, especially in Western Africa and in Southeast Asia (Philippine “negritos,” for instance. [] Key Result The examination of the Tabon human remains shows a large variability: large and robust for one part of the sample, and small and gracile for the other part. The latter would fit quite comfortably within the range of variation of Philippine negritos. Farther north, on Luzon Island, the human third metatarsal recently recovered…

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