“Our Backs Are Against the Wall”: The Black Liberation Army and Domestic Terrorism in 1970s America

@article{Rosenau2013OurBA,
  title={“Our Backs Are Against the Wall”: The Black Liberation Army and Domestic Terrorism in 1970s America},
  author={William Rosenau},
  journal={Studies in Conflict \& Terrorism},
  year={2013},
  volume={36},
  pages={176 - 192}
}
  • William Rosenau
  • Published 18 January 2013
  • Political Science
  • Studies in Conflict & Terrorism
This article addresses the gap in the literature on U.S. domestic terrorism and counterterrorism in the 1970s by examining a once-notorious but now largely forgotten terrorist group, the Black Liberation Army (BLA). An outgrowth of the Black Panther Party, the BLA was directly responsible for at least 20 fatalities, making it amongst the most lethal “homegrown” U.S. groups of the period. This article seeks to shed new light on the BLA by exploring its relatively short but violent trajectory. By… 

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