“Oh Dear, Yes!”: Mashing up Little Women, Vampires, and Werewolves

@article{DalyGaleano2019OhDY,
  title={“Oh Dear, Yes!”: Mashing up Little Women, Vampires, and Werewolves},
  author={Marlowe Daly-Galeano},
  journal={Women's Studies},
  year={2019},
  volume={48},
  pages={393 - 406}
}
For a brief period that began in 2009 with Seth Grahame-Smith and Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, one could hardly escape the garish bookstore displays of horror mashups, featuring works like Jane Slayre and Sense and Sensibility and Sea Monsters. Novels by Jane Austen, Charlotte Brontë, and Charles Dickens were all adapted into horror mashups. Although most mashed up works were nineteenth-century British novels, the fad also traveled to America. In 2010, Louisa May Alcott’s… 

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