“Obesity Is a Disease”

@article{Hoyt2014ObesityIA,
  title={“Obesity Is a Disease”},
  author={Crystal L. Hoyt and Jeni L Burnette and Lisa A Auster-Gussman},
  journal={Psychological Science},
  year={2014},
  volume={25},
  pages={1002 - 997}
}
In the current work, we examined the impact of the American Medical Association’s recent classification of obesity as a disease on weight-management processes. Across three experimental studies, we highlighted the potential hidden costs associated with labeling obesity as a disease, showing that this message, presented in an actual New York Times article, undermined beneficial weight-loss self-regulatory processes. A disease-based, relative to an information-based, weight-management message… 
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