“Me longeth sore to Bernysdale”: Centralization, Resistance, and the Bare Life of the Greenwood in A Gest of Robyn Hode

@article{Taylor2013MeLS,
  title={“Me longeth sore to Bernysdale”: Centralization, Resistance, and the Bare Life of the Greenwood in A Gest of Robyn Hode},
  author={Josephine Taylor},
  journal={Modern Philology},
  year={2013},
  volume={110},
  pages={313 - 339}
}
Critics have long regarded the fifteenth-century ballad A Gest of Robyn Hode as a distinctly northern text. The extant prints of the Gest, as Masa Ikegami has shown, clearly demonstrate dialect characteristics common to the general area of southern Yorkshire where the ballad’s events are said to take place. The narrative, further, references various northern locales. At the outset of the Gest, Robin tells Little John, Much the Miller’s Son, and Will Scarlet to “walke up to the Saylis, / And so… 

References

SHOWING 1-6 OF 6 REFERENCES

The Language and the Date of A Gest of RobynHode

    Robin Hood: Thinking Globally

      Murder at Cocklodge

        The Murder at Cocklodge

        • Durham University Journal
        • 1965