“Let’s help our own”: Humanitarian compassion as racial governance in settler colonialism

@inproceedings{Murdocca2020LetsHO,
  title={“Let’s help our own”: Humanitarian compassion as racial governance in settler colonialism},
  author={Carmela Murdocca},
  year={2020}
}
This article explores narratives of humanitarian compassion as rendered intelligible through the relational intersecting concerns about Syrian refugees and the suicide crisis in the Indigenous community of Attawapiskat, Ontario. Fuelled by a combination of anti-refugee rhetoric, racism and ongoing colonialism experienced by Indigenous people and communities, public and media discourse reveals how humanitarian governance is constitutive of the genealogy of settler colonialism. I suggest that… 
2 Citations
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