“If there is no water, we cannot feed our children”: The far‐reaching consequences of water insecurity on infant feeding practices and infant health across 16 low‐ and middle‐income countries

@article{Schuster2019IfTI,
  title={“If there is no water, we cannot feed our children”: The far‐reaching consequences of water insecurity on infant feeding practices and infant health across 16 low‐ and middle‐income countries},
  author={Roseanne C. Schuster and Margaret S. Butler and Amber Wutich and Joshua D. Miller and Sera L. Young},
  journal={American Journal of Human Biology},
  year={2019},
  volume={32}
}
Infant feeding plays a critical role in child health and development. Few studies to date have examined the link between household water insecurity and infant feeding, and none in a cross‐cultural context. Therefore, we examined the perceived impact of household water insecurity in four domains: breastfeeding, non‐breastmilk feeding, caregiver capabilities, and infant health. Our research was conducted as part of the Household Water Insecurity Experiences (HWISE) study. 

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