“I heard voices…”: From semiology, a historical review, and a new hypothesis on the presumed epilepsy of Joan of Arc

@article{Dorsi2006IHV,
  title={“I heard voices…”: From semiology, a historical review, and a new hypothesis on the presumed epilepsy of Joan of Arc},
  author={G. D'orsi and P. Tinuper},
  journal={Epilepsy \& Behavior},
  year={2006},
  volume={9},
  pages={152-157}
}
PURPOSE Some consider the "voices" of Joan of Arc to have been ecstatic epileptic auras, such as Dostoevsky's epilepsy. We performed a critical analysis of this hypothesis and suggest that the "voices" may be the expression of an epileptic syndrome recently described: idiopathic partial epilepsy with auditory features (IPEAF). METHODS Joan's symptoms were obtained from the documentation of her Trial of Condemnation. We investigated Joan of Arc from a strictly semiologic point of view… Expand
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