“I Want to Stand on My Own Legs”: a qualitative study of antiretroviral therapy adherence among HIV-positive women in Egypt

@article{Badahdah2011IWT,
  title={“I Want to Stand on My Own Legs”: a qualitative study of antiretroviral therapy adherence among HIV-positive women in Egypt},
  author={Abdallah Badahdah and Daphne E. Pedersen},
  journal={AIDS Care},
  year={2011},
  volume={23},
  pages={700 - 704}
}
Abstract A review of the antiretroviral therapy (ART) literature revealed that not a single published study has examined the factors that influence patients’ adherence to HIV medications in the Arab world. To mend this gap, this qualitative study collected data via face-to-face interviews with 27 HIV-positive Egyptian women who had been on ART for at least three months. Using a thematic analysis technique, five themes were identified: fear of stigma, financial constraints, characteristics of… 

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