“I'm Innocent!”: Effects of Training on Judgments of Truth and Deception in the Interrogation Room

@article{Kassin1999ImIE,
  title={“I'm Innocent!”: Effects of Training on Judgments of Truth and Deception in the Interrogation Room},
  author={S. Kassin and C. Fong},
  journal={Law and Human Behavior},
  year={1999},
  volume={23},
  pages={499-516}
}
The present research examined the extent to which people can distinguish true and false denials made in a criminal interrogation, and tested the hypothesis that training in the use of verbal and nonverbal cues increases the accuracy of these judgments. In Phase One, 16 participants committed one of four mock crimes (breaking and entering, vandalism, shoplifting, a computer break-in) or a related but innocent act. Given incentives to deny involvement rather than confess, these suspects were then… Expand

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