“How a (Black) Man Should Live”: Southern “Places” of Memory, Instruction, and Transformation in Ernest J. Gaines's A Lesson before Dying

@article{Martin2012HowA,
  title={“How a (Black) Man Should Live”: Southern “Places” of Memory, Instruction, and Transformation in Ernest J. Gaines's A Lesson before Dying},
  author={C. B. Martin},
  journal={The Journal of Men's Studies},
  year={2012},
  volume={20},
  pages={243 - 258}
}
  • C. B. Martin
  • Published 2012
  • Sociology
  • The Journal of Men's Studies
In A Lesson Before Dying (1993/1994), Ernest J. Gaines situates the courthouse, the jail, the home, and the church as central to the gendered racial consciousness of African American men and boys. With their distinctive American and keenly southern histories, each site holds particular significance to the lives of African American males. For the Black men and boys in Gaines's novel, especially the protagonists Grant Wiggins and Jefferson, each location functions as a poignant place of memory… Expand
1 Citations

References

SHOWING 1-3 OF 3 REFERENCES
Making Place, Making Race: Performances of Whiteness in the Jim Crow South
Abstract This article examines the process of racialization as an essential aspect of how everyday geographies are made, understood, and challenged. It begins from the premise that a primary root ofExpand