“Hormesis”—An Inappropriate Extrapolation from the Specific to the Universal

@article{Axelrod2004HormesisAnIE,
  title={“Hormesis”—An Inappropriate Extrapolation from the Specific to the Universal},
  author={Deborah Axelrod and Kathy Burns and Devra Lee Davis and Nicolas von Larebeke},
  journal={International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health},
  year={2004},
  volume={10},
  pages={335 - 339}
}
Abstract Although it is generally accepted that some chemicals may have beneficial effects af low doses, incorporating these effects into risk assessments generally ignores well-established factors related to exposure and human susceptibility. The authors argue against indiscriminate application of hormesis in assessments of chemical risks for regulatory purposes. 

Topics from this paper

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