“Enter for Free”: Exhibiting Woodcuts on a Street Corner in Mexico City

@article{Montgomery2011EnterFF,
  title={“Enter for Free”: Exhibiting Woodcuts on a Street Corner in Mexico City},
  author={Harper Montgomery},
  journal={Art Journal},
  year={2011},
  volume={70},
  pages={26 - 39}
}
Pedestrians walking past a tent pitched on a busy street corner in Mexico City during January of 1929 would have seen a sign prominently posted over the tent's doorway inviting them to “Enter for Free.” If they accepted mis invitation and entered the tent, they would have found small black-and-white woodcut prints by many different artists, pinned to the canvas interior in rows, mounted and unframed. 

Starting from Mexico: Estridentismo as an Avant-Garde Model

The avant-garde movement Estridentismo (Stridentism) erupted in 1921, in the aftermath of the Mexican Revolution, with the distribution of the poet Manuel Maples Arce's subversive manifesto Actual

References

SHOWING 1-7 OF 7 REFERENCES

clippingfrom the Jean Charlot Collection. University of Hawaii; and "Los Pequerios grabadores en madera

  • Revista de Revistas

More research would likelyreveal a dynamic circulation of woodcut images occurring among figures includingJose Carlos Mariategui in Lima

    Tres lIamamientos de orientacion actual a los pintores y escultores de la nueva generaclon Americana"; and Xavier Villaruttia

      Platica sobre pintura," in ;30-301: Organa de los pintores de Mexico

      • fae. rep

      Un precursor del movimiento de arte mexicano" and "EIGrabado en Madera

        Contra /a academia de pintura. 1928, n.p.; Merida

          Meyer Schapiro describes how abstract paintings can offer this experience

          • Modern Art: 19thand 20th Centuries
          • 1937