“Don't Tread on Me”: The Ethos of '60s Garage Punk

@article{Bovey2006DontTO,
  title={“Don't Tread on Me”: The Ethos of '60s Garage Punk},
  author={Seth Bovey},
  journal={Popular Music and Society},
  year={2006},
  volume={29},
  pages={451 - 459}
}
  • Seth Bovey
  • Published 2006
  • Sociology
  • Popular Music and Society
The term “punk,” when used in reference to '60s garage music, is not well understood. In essence, garage punk developed when American youths mimicked the sound of British R&B and the attitudes of British rockers, but ended up creating a cruder, snottier, and more urgent sound that expressed their own concerns and views of life. Garage punk focuses on liberation from social expectations, conventions, and mores, and it usually takes the form of songs in which the garage punk puts down or rejects… Expand

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