“Deaf Discourse”: The Social Construction of Deafness in a Bedouin Community

@article{Kisch2008DeafDT,
  title={“Deaf Discourse”: The Social Construction of Deafness in a Bedouin Community},
  author={S. Kisch},
  journal={Medical Anthropology},
  year={2008},
  volume={27},
  pages={283 - 313}
}
  • S. Kisch
  • Published 2008
  • Sociology, Medicine
  • Medical Anthropology
Among the Al-Sayyid Arab-Bedouin, the use of an indigenous sign language is widespread and provides the foundation of a signing community shared by hearing and deaf people. Cases with comparable high incidences of deafness have in recent years stimulated debates in diverse academic disciplines. Lacking an accurate term, they are regularly referred to as “Martha's Vineyard situations” and have often been oversimplified and romanticized. This article provides an in-depth analysis of a Bedouin… Expand
Deafness among the Negev Bedouin: an interdisciplinary dialogue on deafness, marginality and context
Shifra Kisch analyses the social consequences of deafness and the sociolinguistic context of signing among the Negev Bedouin, the native Arab inhabitants of the southern arid region of present-dayExpand
Deaf Sociality and the Deaf Lutheran Church in Adamorobe, Ghana
This article provides an ethnographic analysis of “deaf sociality” in Adamorobe, a village in Ghana, where the relatively high prevalence of hereditary deafness has led to dense social and spatialExpand
Anthropological Currents
  • Current Anthropology
  • 2009
Imagine living in a small, tightly knit community where every member, hearing and deaf alike, requires translation to communicate. This is the circumstance of the AlSayyid Bedouin in Israel’s NegevExpand
VOS Sampling Shared Sign Languages
This article addresses some of the theoretical questions, ethical considerations, and methodological decisions that guided the creation of the Kata Kolok corpus as well as the Kata Kolok childExpand
Deaf identities in a multicultural setting: The Ugandan context
TLDR
The study finds that beneath the more pragmatic identities documented in the United States and European discourses there is a matrix of ambiguous, often competing and manifold forms in Uganda that are not necessarily based on the deaf and deaf constructions. Expand
“The Gong Gong Was Beaten” —Adamorobe: A “Deaf Village” in Ghana and Its Marriage Prohibition for Deaf Partners
Adamorobe is a village in Ghana where the historical presence of a hereditary form of deafness resulted in a high number of deaf inhabitants. Over the centuries, a local sign language emerged, whichExpand
Forbidden Signs: Deafness and Language Socialization in Mexico City
Language socialization, the simultaneous process of learning language and culture, occurs spontaneously in most families. However, deaf children born to hearing parents cannot fully access the spokenExpand
Disablement, gender, and deafhood among the Negev Arab-Bedouin
TLDR
An analysis of the intersection of deafness and gender is provided, focusing on the way marriage and schooling inform the lives of deaf Bedouin women and men, and shape their different lived experience and structure of opportunities. Expand
Who Signs? Language Ideologies about Deaf and Hearing Child Signers in One Family in Mexico
Abstract:Little is known about local, vernacular language ideologies about sign language development in deaf and hearing children in diverse communicative ecologies from the perspectives ofExpand
Endangerment and Revitalization of Sign Languages
To date, relatively little effort has been expended on revitalizing sign languages. To understand the current vitality of sign languages, it is important to distinguish two sociolinguistic types ofExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 68 REFERENCES
SIGNS OF THEIR TIMES: Deaf Communities and the Culture of Language
▪ Abstract Because of their deafness, deaf people have been marked as different and treated problematically by their hearing societies. Until 25 years ago, academic literature addressing deafnessExpand
Disablement, gender, and deafhood among the Negev Arab-Bedouin
TLDR
An analysis of the intersection of deafness and gender is provided, focusing on the way marriage and schooling inform the lives of deaf Bedouin women and men, and shape their different lived experience and structure of opportunities. Expand
The Mask of Benevolence: Disabling the Deaf Community
made the case effectively. Discrimination has existed in the United States since the first school for the deaf was established in the early 19th century and existed in France for generations beforeExpand
Culture and deafness in a Maya Indian village.
TLDR
The purpose of this paper is to present preliminary data on a group of profoundly, congenitally deaf Maya Indians of southeastern Mexico, with the aim of suggesting hypotheses which may be investigated by future research. Expand
A journey into the deaf-world
A new language minority has come to the fore in America and around the world. It is the tight-knit society -- some million strong in the United States -- that calls itself, in American Sign Language,Expand
The Oxford handbook of deaf studies, language, and education
Oxford Handbooks offer authoritative and up-to-date reviews of original research in a particular subject area. Specially commissioned chapters from leading figures in the discipline give criticalExpand
Understanding Deaf Culture: In Search of Deafhood
Introduction - Walking the tight trope 1. Deaf Community 2. Deafness and Deafhood in Western Civilisation: Towards the Development of a New Conceptual Framework 3. Twentieth Century Discourses onExpand
The Sound of Silence in Nohya: A Preliminary Account of Sign Language Use by the Deaf in a Maya Community in Yucatan, Mexico.
Abstract This paper describes the system of manual communication used by the deaf in a small Maya Indian village in Yucatan, Mexico. The SL is analyzed at two levels recommended by Voegelin. First,Expand
Sign Language, Culture & Community in a Traditional Yucatec Maya Village
A traditional Mayan village in the state of Yucatan has an unusually high number of deaf inhabitants (13 of about 400). The deaf people have a rich sign language, which is not the same sign languageExpand
A Community of Secrets: The Separate World of Bedouin Women
  • L. Abu-Lughod
  • Sociology
  • Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society
  • 1985
The terms "harem" and "seclusion," so intertwined with popular and scholarly conceptions of Arab women, are in most respects grossly misleading. Conjuring up provocative images of groups of idleExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...