“Allow natural death” versus “do not resuscitate”: three words that can change a life

@article{Venneman2007AllowND,
  title={“Allow natural death” versus “do not resuscitate”: three words that can change a life},
  author={S. Venneman and P. Narnor-Harris and M. Perish and M. Hamilton},
  journal={Journal of Medical Ethics},
  year={2007},
  volume={34},
  pages={2 - 6}
}
Physician-written “do not resuscitate” DNR orders elicit negative reactions from stakeholders that may decrease appropriate end-of-life care. The semantic significance of the phrase has led to a proposed replacement of DNR with “allow natural death” (AND). Prior to this investigation, no scientific papers address the impact of such a change. Our results support this proposition due to increased likelihood of endorsement with the term AND. 
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The study’s results are not generalisable to the populations of physicians and working nurses and certainly do not support the authors’ claim that there is a movement to replace DNR with AND. Expand
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Perceptions of physicians and nurses about using the more holistic “allow natural death” terminology in end-of-life care as opposed to the current “do not resusciate” (DNR) order are surveyed. Expand
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Allow-Natural-Death (AND) Orders: Legal, Ethical, and Practical Considerations
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  • Medicine
  • HEC forum : an interdisciplinary journal on hospitals' ethical and legal issues
  • 2013
TLDR
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TLDR
How these laws evolved, how seminal cases and medical and ethical advances helped shape the current state of end-of-life legislation, and how patients—especially those with cancer—began adopting various forms of advance directives will be the topic of this article. Expand
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