“A deadly ball hath limited my life”: social constructs of the ‘Good Battlefield Death’ in the Revolutionary War

@inproceedings{Talkington2014ADB,
  title={“A deadly ball hath limited my life”: social constructs of the ‘Good Battlefield Death’ in the Revolutionary War},
  author={Brittney Talkington},
  year={2014}
}
The “Good Death,” as it was understood in the eighteenth century, involved being aware that one was going to die, making one’s peace with God, and having family and friends at the bedside to receive wisdom and edification. The dying person occupied a space between worlds, according to popular belief, and could give clues to those present at the deathbed about the mysteries of God and sacred truths. The battlefield death, with its suddenness, lack of decorum, and unpredictability, did not fit… CONTINUE READING

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