“A DEAF VARIETY OF THE HUMAN RACE”: HISTORICAL MEMORY, ALEXANDER GRAHAM BELL, AND EUGENICS

@article{Greenwald2014ADV,
  title={“A DEAF VARIETY OF THE HUMAN RACE”: HISTORICAL MEMORY, ALEXANDER GRAHAM BELL, AND EUGENICS},
  author={Brian H Greenwald and J. V. Van Cleve},
  journal={The Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era},
  year={2014},
  volume={14},
  pages={28 - 48}
}
Abstract Alexander Graham Bell stood at the intersection of two late nineteenth-century American social developments. First, a nascent deaf community, threaded by residential schools and the use of a shared visual language, began to form by the 1850s, drawing deaf people into regular interaction and intermarriage. Second, the American eugenics movement, determined to eliminate perceived social problems through reproductive restrictions, came to prominence as the century neared its end. Bell's… Expand