“ Accoucheur of literature”: Joseph Banks and the Philosophical Transactions , 1778–1820

@article{Moxham2020A,
  title={“
 Accoucheur
 of literature”: Joseph Banks and the
 Philosophical Transactions
 , 1778–1820},
  author={Noah Moxham},
  journal={Centaurus},
  year={2020},
  volume={62},
  pages={21-37}
}
  • N. Moxham
  • Published 1 February 2020
  • Economics
  • Centaurus
4 Citations

The practice of note-taking in Taylor White's natural history collection

Between the 1750s and 1770s Taylor White compiled over 750 manuscript notes to accompany his collection of animal portraits. These notes are written on individual unbound sheets of paper, and offer

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 34 REFERENCES

II. Miscellaneous observations

  • W. Herschel
  • Physics
    Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London
Last Thursday evening, the 15th of December, about half after eight o'clock, while I was taken up with observing Saturn, my sister looked over the heavens, and discovered a pretty large, telescopic

XII. Observations on a comet. In a letter from William Herschel, LL. D F. R. S. to Sir Joseph Banks, Bart. P. R. S

  • W. Herschel
  • Physics
    Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London
  • 1789
Sir, The last time I was in town, you expressed a wish to see my observations on the comet which my sister, Caroline Herschel, discovered in the evening of the 21st of last December, not far from β

XX. Catalogue of a second thousand of new nebulæ and clusters of stars; with a few introductory remarks on the construction of the heavens

  • W. Herschel
  • Physics
    Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London
  • 1789
By the continuation of a review of the heavens with my twenty-feet reflector, I am now furnished with a second thousand of new Nebulæ.

V. On the method of determining, from the real probabilities of life, the value of a contingent reversion in which three lives are involved in the survivorship

  • W. Morgan
  • Economics
    Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London
  • 1789
In a paper which I had lately the honour of communicating to the Royal Society, respecting the method of determining the values of reversions depending on survivorships between two persons from the

XX. On the probabilities of survivorships between two persons of any given ages, and the method of determining the values of reversions depending on those survivorships

  • W. Morgan
  • Psychology
    Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London
  • 1788
The hypothesis of an equal decrement of life, adopted by M. de Moivre, for the purpose of facilitating the computations of life annuities, has not only been rendered unnecessary bu the late

II. Remarks on the new comet. In a letter from William Herschel, LLD. F. R. S. to Charles Blagden, M. D. Sec. R. S

  • W. Herschel
  • Linguistics
    Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London
  • 1787
Dear Sir, As my Sister's letter of the 2d of August, relative to the come discovered by her, has had the honour of being communicated to the Royal Society, I beg leave to add the following remarks

I. An account of a new comet. In a letter from Miss Caroline Herschel to Charles Blagden, M.D. Sec. R. S

  • Caroline Herschel
  • Physics
    Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London
  • 1787
Sir, In consequence of the friendship which I know to exist between you and my Brother, I venture to trouble you in his absence with the following imperfect account of a comet.

XIV. Electrical experiments made in order to ascertain the non-conducting power of a perfect vacuum

  • W. Morgan
  • Education, Physics
    Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London
  • 1785
The non-conducting power of a perfect vacuum is a fact in electricity which has been much controverted among philosophers. The experiments made by Mr. Walsh, F. R. S. in the double barometer tube

XXXII. Account of a comet

  • W. Herschel
  • Physics
    Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London
On Tuesday the 13th of March, between ten and eleven in the evening, while I was examining the small stars in the neighbourhood of H Geminorum, I perceived one that appeared visibly larger than the

The Role of Patronage in early nineteenth-century science, as evidenced in letters from Humphry Davy to Joseph Banks

The recently published Collected edition of Davy's letters throws new light on the importance and modus operandi of Banksian patronage as a means of organizing and promoting science. It demonstrates