‘You think your writing belongs to you?’: Intertextuality in Contemporary Jewish Post-Holocaust Literature

@inproceedings{Gwyer2018YouTY,
  title={‘You think your writing belongs to you?’: Intertextuality in Contemporary Jewish Post-Holocaust Literature},
  author={Kirstin Gwyer},
  year={2018}
}
This article examines a sub-category of recent Jewish post-Holocaust fiction that engages with the absent memory of the persecution its authors did not personally witness through the medium of intertextuality, but with intertextual recourse not to testimonial writing but to literature only unwittingly or retrospectively shadowed by the Holocaust. It will be proposed that this practice of intertextuality constitutes a response to the post-Holocaust Jewish author’s ‘anxiety of influence’ that, in… CONTINUE READING

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