‘Wired up differently’: Autism, adolescence and the politics of neurological identities

@article{Ortega2011WiredUD,
  title={‘Wired up differently’: Autism, adolescence and the politics of neurological identities},
  author={Francisco Ortega and Suparna Choudhury},
  journal={Subjectivity},
  year={2011},
  volume={4},
  pages={323-345}
}
With the rapid rise in neuroscience research in the last two decades, neuroscientific claims have travelled far beyond the laboratory and increasingly, ‘facts’ about the brain have entered the popular imagination. As cognitive neuroscience steps up its focus on neurological distinctions between different ‘kinds of people’, researchers in the social sciences and humanities have begun to investigate the role of neurological vocabulary in the constitution of identities. In this article, we explore… Expand
Science in Society: Neuroscience and Lay Understandings of Self and Identity
Abstract The dying days of the twentieth century were witness to an invigoration of the brain sciences, as governments worldwide declared that the 1990s would go down in official history as theExpand
The trouble with brain imaging: Hope, uncertainty and ambivalence in the neuroscience of autism
This article is about ambivalent dynamics of hope and uncertainty within neurobiological autism research. While much literature has commented on the positive hopes and expectations that surroundExpand
“Asperger’s syndrome does not exist”: the limits of brain-based identity discourses around Asperger’s syndrome and autism in Italy
Brain-based identities, especially around autism, have received much attention in recent literature on biopolitics through concepts such as brainhood, cerebral selfhood, and neurochemical selves.Expand
Brains and psyches: Child psychological and psychiatric expertise in a Swedish newspaper, 1980–2008
Most children and families have not had direct contact with child psychological and psychiatric experts. Instead they encounter developmental theories, etiological explanations and depictions ofExpand
Commentary: “Why Not Both?” Negotiating Ideas About Autism in Italy, Brazil, and the US
This chapter is a commentary on “Autism Policy in Brazil and the USA” and “Psychiatric Reform and Autism Services in Italy and Brazil.” It examines a range of views on autism theory and practice,Expand
Brain talk: power and negotiation in children’s discourse about self, brain and behaviour
  • I. Singh
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Sociology of health & illness
  • 2013
TLDR
Despite their contact with psychiatric explanations and psychotropic drugs for their behaviour, children’s discursive engagements with the brain show significant evidence of agency and negotiated responsibility, suggesting the limitations of current concepts that describe a collapse of the self into the brain in an age of neurocentrism. Expand
The changing face of autism in Brazil
TLDR
Comparisons are found between the ethical and political goals of parent activists and mental health professionals in Brazil, but it is argued that the main cause of dissent is the role that each of these social actors assigns to identity politics in their clinical and political projects. Expand
Autism
The concept of autism is historically contingent. It did not exist, in any proper sense, before it was invoked by medical and mental health professionals in the twentieth century. This entry aims toExpand
Autism
The concept of autism is historically contingent. It did not exist, in any proper sense, before it was invoked by medical and mental health professionals in the twentieth century. This entry aims toExpand
Exploring the impact of a developing sexuality on adolescents with autism
This research project sought to understand as far as possible what meanings the period of development termed as ‘adolescence’ meant for a small group of young men on the autism spectrum, asExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 83 REFERENCES
Rebelling against the brain: public engagement with the 'neurological adolescent'.
TLDR
How teens may hold ambivalent and sometimes resistant views of cognitive neuroscience's teen brain model in terms of their own self-understandings is shown to show that new "neuro"-identity formations are more fractured, resisted and incomplete than some of the current social science literature on neuro-subjectivities seem to suggest. Expand
The Cerebral Subject and the Challenge of Neurodiversity
The neurodiversity movement has so far been dominated by autistic people who believe their condition is not a disease to be treated and, if possible, cured, but rather a human specificity (like sexExpand
Constructing Autism: Unravelling the 'Truth' and Understanding the Social
Autism is now considered to be one of the most common developmental disorders today, yet 100 years ago the term did not exist. This book examines the historical and social events that enabled autismExpand
Fieldwork on Another Planet: Social Science Perspectives on the Autism Spectrum
The autism spectrum disorders are a group of neurodevelopmental syndromes of communication, behavior and social cognition. Over the past decade, they have received increasing attention from scholarsExpand
Mind-Body Problems
In this article, I lay out some of the cultural assumptions in recent accounts of mind and brain in neuroscience, in which it is argued that human social activities can be reduced to neural processesExpand
Is It Me or My Brain? Depression and Neuroscientific Facts
This article considers the roles played by brain images (e.g., from PET scans) in mass media as experienced by people suffering from mental illness, and as used by scientists and activist groups inExpand
The History of Ideas on Autism
The development of ideas about the nature of autism is described, covering myths and legends, accounts of individuals in the historical literature, the search for identifiable subgroups, Kanner'sExpand
Mapping the cerebral subject in contemporary culture
The research reported here aims at mapping the “cerebral subject” in contemporary society. The term “cerebral subject” refers to an anthropological figure that embodies the belief that human beingsExpand
Contested Boundaries: psychiatry, disease, and diagnosis
  • C. Rosenberg
  • Medicine
  • Perspectives in biology and medicine
  • 2006
TLDR
Even in the era of reductionist hopes, psychopharmaceutical practice, and corporate strategies, the legitimacy of many putative disease categories will remain contested, and the use of the specific disease entity model will always be a reductionist means to achieve necessarily holistic ends. Expand
Modern Views of Autism
  • E. Fombonne
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Canadian journal of psychiatry. Revue canadienne de psychiatrie
  • 2003
TLDR
The word “autism” was first used by Bleuler to index a cardinal sign of schizophrenia, and its use to describe the syndrome unfortunately led to 30 years of controversy about the validity of autism as a distinct syndrome vis-vis adult psychoses. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...